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» » Jan Marmenout - Fujara
Jan Marmenout - Fujara album download

Performer:

Jan Marmenout

Title:

Fujara

Genre:

Electro / Folk / Country

MP3 album size:

1803 mb

Other music formats:

AHX AIFF AUD MP3 ASF DTS MPC

Rating:

4.8 ✱

Style:

Ambient, Folk

Date of release:

1998

Jan Marmenout - Fujara album download

Album FUJARA by Jan Mamernout. With these recordings, I hope to reveal something of the fascinating sound of the Fujara. Featuring Fujara and Didgeridoo playing together! I also hope that, far from being a traditional fujara-player, I can contribute a bit to the discovery and appreciation of maybe one of the oldest flutes from our Western culture. Fujara is one of the oldest flutes of eastern Europe. A real discovery!" Jan. Jan's musical CV. Tracklist: . pening II 6:13 - Singing bowls, Spanish Cowbell, Fujara. 2. Waves 1:16 - Four double Fujara's. 3. Fujara 12:53 - Fujara, Berimbau, Shruti-box, Rattles, Swedish overtone Flute, Tingsha's. Digitally recorded, mixed and mastered at Highgate Music by Ivan Candaele. Basic dubs of tracks 3 and 10 recorded by Philippe de Chaffoy.

Fujara-head solo by Jan Marmenout video Patrick Baele. Jan Marmenout 2:59 8,444. Fujara improvisation by jan marmenout(duo with jacques vandevelde) video Patrick Baele. Jan Marmenout 4:50 1,461. Drops - Jan Marmenout. Patrick Baele 1:24 54. Play Download. Litophone Improvisation 1 - @Jan Marmenout - 2008 - video:Patrick Baele. Patrick Baele 2:42 231.

Jan Marmenout (born in Ghent, Belgium) is a Belgian percusionist and t playing such instruments as the berimbau, kalimba, balafon, didgeridoo, shawm, Tibetan trumpet, conch shells, fujara, lithophones, etc. He is perhaps most-known for his compositions on the fujara, an ethnic instrument from Slovakia. Marmenout plays the fujara in an intuitive and non-traditionalist way. He has composed the score for two movies, Judentransport XX (2003) and Desperado (2002).

The fujara belongs to the solo-instruments. It consists of two main-parts; a whistle pipe and an air-pipe and there are only three holes for finger playing. In general it's also beautifully decorated and it can take up to one month to build a good Fujara. I also hope that, far from being a traditional fujara-player, I can contribute a bit to the discovery and appreciation of maybe one of the oldest flutes from our Western culture.

Tracklist

1 Opening II 6:13
2 Waves 1:16
3 Fujara 12:53
4 Lost Valleys 7:56
5 Riding The Wind 5:34
6 Coming Home 8:21
7 Melange Bizarre 3:42
8 The Gift 10:49
9 Puja 4:02
10 Sundance 4:58
11 Double Fujara 5:17

Credits

  • Producer – Ivan Candaele

Notes

During one of my recent travels through the East of Europe, I heard about the existence in Slovakia of a huge (± 1,70 m) overtone-flute, called 'Fujara'. The first time I saw that beautiful flute in Austria and tried to play on it, I was at once fascinated by it's warm deep Archaïc sound. I fell directly in love with it and although I didn't know anything about the traditional way to play it, I set of with a friend to Slovakia, bought one there and started to play on it every day. Later I've met some local musicians playing it for me, and also I listened frequently to some recordings from the Fujara, played in purely traditional style.
Although, having a deep respect for tradition, I discovered that this instrument can also be played and used in many other ways. It has a definite 'meditative' quality and also a lot of 'rhythmical' possibilities. Being myself originally a percussionist, I'm appreciating this very much.
It's undoubtedly the strangest, biggest and most majestic flute of Europe and maybe it isn't wrong to say it could be our Western equivalent (although much taller, differently shaped and with another playing technique) of the world-known Japanese Shakuhachi.
Traditionally it's made totally by hand from deciduous trees (elder tree, maple tree). It's a typical folk instrument and it's native home is a small region in central Slovakia, called Zvolenska country. The fujara belongs to the solo-instruments. It consists of two main-parts; a whistle pipe and an air-pipe and there are only three holes for finger playing. In general it's also beautifully decorated and it can take up to one month to build a good Fujara.
With these recordings, I hope to reveal something of the fascinating sound of the Fujara. I also hope that, far from being a traditional fujara-player, I can contribute a bit to the discovery and appreciation of maybe one of the oldest flutes from our Western culture. (Jan)

1. Singing bowls, Spanish Cowbell, Fujara
2. Four double fujara's
3. Fujara, Berimbau, Shruti-box, Rattles, Swedish overtone Flute, Tingsha's
4. Didge 1&2, Shruti-box, Fujara
5. Fujara, Jew's Harp, Bull-roarer, Tube, Frame-drum
6. Fujara, Shruti-box
7. Jew's harp, Udu, Shakers, Fujara, Didge
8. Fujara, Singing Bowl, Bass-drum, Jew's Harp, Triangle, Conga
9. Jew's Harp, Fujara, Singing Bowl, Bass-drum, Voice, Ghost-tube, Nepalese Bell
10. Fujara's, Udu's, Wind-chimes, Jew's Harp, Shakers
11. Two fujara's

Credits:
All compositions written and all instruments played by Jan Marmenout.
Digitally recorded, mixed and mastered at Highgate Music by Ivan Candaele.
Basic dubs of tracks 3 and 10 recorded by Philippe de Chaffoy.
Produced by Ivan Candaele.

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